Dating pearl drums

While they are quite rare, a metal shell Broadcaster was also available in 1935.

Few examples exist today................................................................................................................................................................................................................ toms were available in various sizes: 6x10, 7x11, 8x12, 9x13, 12x14, 16x14 and 16x16.

By 1937, most lugs were equipped with spring-loaded, threaded inserts, which eliminated cross threading problems.

The new extended patent pending adjustable snares gates were first used on this model, as well.

The Speedy Sure Hold snare strainer (known to collectors as the three point strainer) was used on all snare drums except for the lower line models.

The Black Beauty Artist models were introduced in 1928 and were discontinued around 1935.

During the war (1942-45) and until about 1947, the aluminum cloud badge was often used in addition to the brass version.

It is interesting to note that WWII Rolling Bombers did not have aluminum badges.

The tone flange was actually still available in the late 1930s and could conceivably be ordered on a Radio King drum.

This drum featured the new Super lugs and the innovative Super snare strainer.

The Super lugs (also known as the small beaver tail lugs) were available on snare drums as well as tom toms and even bass drums.

was soon discontinued after about a year due to a lawsuit over patent infringement with the Ludwig & Ludwig Drum Company.

There were a few different strainer designs, including one type that utilizes a wire cable instead of a metal rod. While not actually catalogued, the Broadcaster was the forerunner to the Radio King models.

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